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Oct 4, 2021 in 

Values and Goals

Relationship between values and goals. How to use your core values to achieve your goals.

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Joana Llasses

Career Coach

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Do you know which should be the first step of a heart-led career change? Have you wondered why aren’t you fulfil in your career? Are you think about why it’s so challenging to achieve your career goals? Or why you are not clear on which career path to follow? Do you know your core values?

If all those questions resound with you, keep reading because this week blog will give you the answer to all these questions.

Let’s start with values; what are the core values? The personal core values are the compass from where a person operates from. They are the principles that guide us and motivate us.

They will bring the sense of purpose, self-worth, and fulfilment we need to feel aligned with our decisions and choices.

What should be the ultimate career goal? The top career goal should be to have a job that aligns with our core values and who we are. The trick is that as human begins, we will change as time and experiences pass by. Your core values are rarely the same at 18, at 25, at 30…

As you evolve and have experienced, probably your values and career goals will change.

And here is why we don’t deal well with that change. This culture makes us choose a career at 18, and it is supposed to be the same for the rest of our lives.

Wrong! You are entitled to change as many times as you like to align with your core values that will automatically match who you are at that point in your life.

So, which is the relationship between career goals and values? As stated before, your stage in life influences your core values and interests.

Identifying your values will be the first step in any career change process.

Values are like the lighthouse that keeps us headed in the desired direction, and goals are the specific ways you intend to execute your values.

It will be impossible to achieve our goals without knowing our core values and making a successful career change without being responsible and aligned with our values. 

And here comes the question, how the values will help to achieve your career goals?

Values will lead you to a bigger purpose, and values will be essential to understand and extract why you want to change or accomplish that goal.  

Here I will give you four questions to link your values with your career goals:

  1. Why is this important for me?
  2. How do I wish to feel after I reach that?
  3. Which problem do I want to solve?
  4. What do I expect to get out of achieving this?

One of the biggest obstacles of a career change, aside from limiting beliefs, and fear of change, is not to do the first step and most significant one. Self-asses our core values to set the right goal and choose the right career path for us.

Without knowing our core values, it is impossible to set the right goal and achieve it successfully. 

One of the most important things we use in coaching is the “Iceberg” of Neurological levels from Robert Dilts. He defines six levels of thinking or situation: Environment, Behaviour, capability or competence, beliefs, identity and spirituality. 

It’s called the iceberg because the above the water levels are (Environment, behaviour and capability or competence) that makes a 7% of consciousness. And then we have the under the water levels (beliefs, identity and spirituality) 93% unconsciousness.

You can tell from which level you are operating by the language you use to discuss a problem or situation. Usually, we are continuously operating from that 3 top levels that are from our conscious mind. But our blocks to not achieve a goal or change something are on the bottom levels.

Our values are on our Neurological Beliefs level (under the water) in our unconscious mind. To make any change on the top levels, we must go deeper on the below levels to change it.

That’s why sometimes it is so hard for us to set meaningful goals and stick to them because we don’t go deeper into our unconscious mind, and we are always operating from our conscious mind. 

If you are here today, reading this, it is because you are thinking of a career change. So the best start will be to discover your core values, and second, find which level you are operating to achieve this goal. Because maybe you have some blocks or need help with something fundamental that gets you closer to landing your dream career.

I create this free guide to discover which part of the iceberg you are operating and find your core values. Don’t delay it more. Download my guide and take the first step today into your heart-led career change.

If you are committed to making this career change, but it looks like you are not getting anywhere by yourself, and you realise you feel stuck and need someone to help you get through it. So let’s have a free vibe call! I got you!

Life is happening right now, and time is the only thing we will never get back, to lose it in a job where we spent most of our time that we hate.  Let’s design your Heart-led Career Change together right now!

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