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Jul 14, 2021 in 

Five Questions to write your career vision statement

Do you think in five years you will be at your current job? How do you feel about it? What is your strategy career-wise?

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Joana Llasses

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If you are complicated to answer those questions, just like I was not long ago. Your career vision is not clear, which will be one of the keys to your career success. In this blog post, I will help you to create your career vision statement.

 

The University of Berkeley quotes, “Your career vision is a picture of what you aspire to – and what inspires you – in your work life”.

If you read my other blogs about purpose and Mission, you already know a bit of my personal history. So you already know that I was always aligned with my Mission, but I haven’t been aligned with my purpose, and that I never had a real clear vision until I become a coach. I never thought until then to put a career vision statement on my CV or put up a career vision board.

If we speak about the CV, I think the vision statement and mission statement are fundamental for you to stand out from the crowd. Suppose you are thinking to change your career. In that case, you want to demonstrate your innate skills and your expertise. So those statements will be a way that you can say a lot already without an interview in a few lines. On the other hand, if you are thinking to start your own business because you are more entrepreneurial. These statements will be critical for you to keep you motivated; and clear on the message you want to transmit to your clients.

Make a career vision board is always a great idea to focus on your goals and vision long term, and see how you complete them. The vision board will give you that reminder every day, and that kick on your ass, to say, let’s keep moving in the right direction. As well as an easy way to track your progress.  

I always make my vision boards on my birthday to focus on what I want to achieve before I got another year old. My last birthday was in September, and the other day I was checking my vision board, and I already achieved two goals of the four I put up this year.

Maybe you got here, and you are a little reluctant; that mindset and vision boards are bullshit. When I start coaching, I have that thought myself, but at the same time, it is no harm trying, so I did it, and it is working fabulously for me!

Now, get a piece of paper, or open your word pad, and let’s start working on your own vision statement. I will share my top 5 questions with you that help the clients on my program: “discover your purpose and talents”.

Take your time replying to your questions, it won’t be easy, and maybe the answers won’t be coming right away, but the answers are there. Make sure you have a solid 30-45 min to do this exercise. It will be worth it. I promise!

  1. Picture your perfect day? (Here, you need to be very detailed. How is your morning? How do you feel? What do you wear? At which time you wake up? Where do you work? Your commute time, do you see your friends? Do you exercise? What do you eat for dinner? What time you go to bed?)
  2. Why do you want to achieve this? 
  3. How this would feel?
  4. If you got a daily top-up of 100,000£, and success was guaranteed, what would you do?
  5. Any differences between the first answer and the last?

We can get three possible scenarios:

  1. Your first answer and the last is totally aligned. Congrats!!! So tell me, what are you waiting for?
  2. Your first answer and the last are somewhat matching, but maybe you need some strategy to get to the solution in point four. Many of my clients are in this situation, and I help them with an action plan to get the ball rollin’ to achieve that vision.
  3. In the most common situation, your answers have nothing to do with each other. Do not worry! This is the usual situation of my clients when they start the coaching process. That means that you have many limiting beliefs in place, and probably you haven’t work on your core values, purpose, and Mission yet.

Suppose you are in the third scenario, and you really want to get this right. In that case, you can subscribe and get my guide of making changes and work on those core values and the first step of any life or career change. Then you can go to my previous blogs Purpose vs passion and Mission on the making 

With that, you should have enough resources to discover your career vision. To put the statements to kill it in your job hunt or to clarify the message if you are thinking to start a business or brand. 

Suppose you think that is too much of a hassle, and you cannot get the answers. In that case, that will be the perfect time to hire a career coach to work on your beliefs, your blocks and start to work on those goals; no one will really do it for you. And you deserve to be happy and fulfilled. Let me help you. I wish I took this decision sooner than I did it. Let’s check our vibes in my free vibe call, and let’s start this heart-led partnership!

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